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20130117
20130125
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
approval rating in a while. this is the natural ebb and flow. it usually builds up after winning re-election. there are a lot of things in the agenda space. you pay off a limited budget right? you can purchase things with that political capital. the horror of newtown is such that it has forced this issue to the foreti particularly in the wake of aurora. if you were designing the agenda in the absence of that and obviously you can't do that is this something that you want to see prioritized or are there other things you would put ahead of it? >> no. this is something that needs to be prioritized. of course the whole issue of sequestration and raising the debt ceiling limit, getting the budget under control, are probably our highest priority at this point in time. we should be meeting four and five days a week in committee doing the job that we were elected to do and the republican leadership has not set a schedule that we can do that. the whole gun control issue has been on the front pages now for decades and the democrats, republicans, none of us have really done anything about it. so i thin
with everything even though they have a bad rating, it doesn't affect their chance of being re-elected. unfortunately, they have been stacking in state legislatures and in the house of representatives, all of these anti-choice laws that are every egregious wiggle they can come in. none of them, by the way would stand up against roe v. wade because there are so many price of concerns in the fetal heart beat bill. they're adding things like she has to be taped listening to it. the fact she's in the office being scrutinized or filmed while she's getting a medical procedure or -- >> it is a violation of privacy. >> hal: it is absurd. >> they do things even so much as -- i don't know if it's law necessarily or if it's just the doctor's preference to find out how far along the woman is but they'll have you get a sonogram and that can be traumatic. >> yeah. >> just making that decision, having to see what is growing at that moment can be traumatic for a woman. unless you're in that position, it is inappropriate for someone to make that change on your behalf. >> hal: i believe that to be the g
of equality and of course the election of president obama, the nation's first african american president that has to be seen as the ultimate political expression of that equality. reporting live in washington, i'm randall pinkston -- pinkston, back to you. >> how will it differ from four years ago? >> reporter: well first of all it will be a ceremonial inauguration, not the official inauguration as we have mentioned earlier on the actual date of the inauguration. it has to be on january 20. that's a sunday. the public wants to witness it themselves. it will be a second ceremonial inauguration on monday that people, they will be able to attend. >> all right, live for us in washington, enjoy the festivities, randall. >>> around here a lot warmer than what he is experiencing there in d.c. and sunny skies this weekend. >> yeah, i was there for the inauguration four years ago. >> you were in >> it was freezing. i thought it was sunny, but freezing. >> makes us feel lucky. >> yeah, kind of like the temperatures where she had this morning with a high surf
election. for now, the next 18 months, obama's going to drive the agenda here in washington. this is the best time for him to get through immigration reform, gun control. this is the time for him right now -- this next year particularly is when he has the most influence that he'll have. >> do you concur with that? if you do, what does that say about the last two years of eight years for a president in the white house? >> it says a lot over the last couple of years about campaigning and doing politics, which is normal for the modern presidency. i disagree a little bit with perry. i think the president has these first 100 days. beyond that, it's dependent upon the state of the economy. that's going to be a determinate factor. >> you say 18 months. you say 100 days. you're tough. >> 100 days, then we'll see. >> there's a new political article i want to go on. it says democratic senators in red states may break with the white house. part of the quote from the article reads as follows -- senior democratic senators and aides say the president must face a stark political reality ev
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
of parties and balls to celebrate her husband's election. in about 40 minutes, president barack obama will receive the official swearing in from chief justice john roberts. he will be at the white house in the blue room. the president's family will be there with some members of the staff. it will be televised and. tomorrow, the ceremonial swearing in where thousands will be watching it on the washington mall. reporting live, randall pinkston, back to you. >> yeah, expecting thousands to be here. how difficult it is for the ordinary citizen to get a good spot to watch the ceremony? >> reporter: well, probably impossible now. here's why. >> yeah. >> reporter: it's a little late. the tickets were given to members of congress, i think about 200,000, or a whole bunch were handed out. and they have been given to constituents and people who ask for them. they are gone. and now you're saying, maybe some office buildings, well monday is a holiday. and office billings will be closed off, except for those who have access to them. that's not to say you can'
in washington, d.c. and the president-elect of the american academy of child and adolescent psychiatry. she has taught and published and barry rosenfeld is professor of psychology and director of clinical training at fordham university. he is a clinical forensic psychologist, whose recent work has focused on assessing the risk of violence in patients. i barry rosenfeld, i'd like to start right there. what's the problem that we need to understand in trying to determine in advance who might be capable of violence as we saw in new toub? >> well, the essence of the problem is that it's a needle in a stay stack. so we've got almost an infinite number of people-- i shouldn't say infinite-- a very large number of people who will fit any profile we might generate and we want to find the one person who's potentially going to be homicidal. there just isn't really a way statistically to identify or clinically to identify that person with any real accuracy. >> brown: dr. joshi, does that mean such limits we can't know what can be done? >> the issue, however, is that young children and adolescents who somet
to protect six democrats who are up for election in two years from now. six seats where the president had fewer than 42% of the votes and i don't think so that they're going to expose the democrats to having to choose between their constituents who know the value and importance of the second amendment and the president's policies. >> steve: what do you think of what mitch mcconnell said in the robo call that went out to several thousand kentuckiens, to make sure he'll do everything in his power to defeat it. >> we know what that means, it has to do with individual's rights to own and bear arms, you know, which is one of the reasons that i've had disagreements with the attorney general, who thinks it has to do only with the well-regulated militia, but i'm a doctor. i know there's much more to this than just what's happening in gun shows or gun shelves. so if the president wants to push a political agenda, if he actually wants to solve a problem of violence in america, there are things that we can do as a doctor, i will tell you this, with regard to mental health, with regard to a culture o
.c. and the president-elect of the american academy of child and adolescent psychiatry. she has taught and published and barry rosenfeld is professor of psychology and director of clinical training at fordham university. he is a clinical forensic psychologist, whose recent work has focused on assessing the risk of violence in patients. i barry rosenfeld, i'd like to start right there. what's the problem that we need to understand in trying to determine in advance who might be capable of violence as we saw in new toub? >> well, the essence of the problem is that it's a needle in a stay stack. so we've got almost an infinite number of people-- i shouldn't say infinite-- a very large number of people who will fit any profile we might generate and we want to find the one person who's potentially going to be homicidal. there just isn't really a way statistically to identify or clinically to identify that person with any real accuracy. >> brown: dr. joshi does that mean such limits we can't know what can be done? >> the issue however is that young children and adolescents who sometimes will have aggressiv
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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